Dual Loyalties

My opinion on the people who shape our world

Sunday, September 26, 2004

Wolfowitz & Woolsey to Hold WW4 Forum In D.C. Sept. 29th

INTL News by Joe Broadhurst - Wolfowitz & Woolsey to Hold WW4 Forum In D.C. Sept. 29th: "Neocons Woolsey & Wolfowitz to hold psycho forum entitled 'World War IV: Why We Fight, Whom We Fight, How We Fight' on September 29th at the Mayflower Hotel in D.C.

Intro blurb on announcement:
The Cold War is now being called by some 'World War III' because it was global, had an ideological basis, involved both military and non-military actions, required skill and the mobilization of extensive resources and lasted for years. Today's 'war on terrorism' has the same elements, hence a broader name, 'World War IV.' Our speakers will explore its antecedents, its methods and its possible outcome.

Click 'read more' for more info...

FULL TEXT
by Steven C. Clemons (WashingtonNote)

JAMES WOOLSEY & CO. WILL OUTLINE WORLD WAR IV STRATEGIES at a forum scheduled two weeks from now on Wednesday, 29 September, at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C.

The forum is disconcertingly titled: 'World War IV: Why We Fight, Whom We Fight, How We Fight,' and is sponsored by the Committee on the Present Danger and the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.

They won't let you in the door as the conference is being organized as a watering hole for like-minded supporters of the Iraq War and those committed to broadening America's military engagement with other 'problem nations' (think Iran and Syria). It runs from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. in case you want to peek in the doors at the Mayflower; there are big open hallways there.

The intro blurb on the announcement reads:

The Cold War is now being called by some 'World War III' because it was global, had an ideological basis, involved both military and non-military actions, require"

Brookings Scholar: Martin S. Indyk

Brookings Scholar: Martin S. Indyk: "Martin S. Indyk
Senior Fellow: Foreign Policy Studies
Director, Saban Center for Middle East Policy

One-Page Bio

Publications on this site



Expertise
Arab-Israeli conflict; Iraq, Iran, and the Persian Gulf; Libya, Algeria and North Africa

Current Projects
Clinton administration diplomacy in the Middle East
Education
Ph.D., Australian National University, 1977; B.Econ., University of Sydney, 1972

Background
Previous Positions: U.S. Ambassador to Israel (1995-97, 2000-01); Assistant Secretary of State for Near East Affairs, U.S. Department of State (1997-2000); Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Near East and South Asian Affairs, National Security Council (1993-95); Executive Director, Washington Institute for Near East Policy; Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins University


Publications


Books:

Contributions to Edited Volumes:



"The Post-War Balance of Power in the Middle East," After the Storm, Lessons from the Gulf War, J. Nye, ed. (Madison Books/Aspen Institute Books, 1992)

Articles:

"A Trusteeship for Palestine?" Foreign Affairs (May 2003)

"U.S. Victory in Iraq Opens Possibility of Palestinian-Israeli Settlement," Ronald W. Burke Forum, UCLA (4/9/03)

"Back to the Bazaar," Foreign Affairs (January 2002)

"U.S. Policy Toward Iran and Iraq: Symposium on Dual Containment," Middle East Policy (1994)

"America's Choice in the Middle East," The National Interest (Winter 1991)

"1991: A Watershed Year in the Middle East," Foreign Affairs (1991)

Congressional Testimony:
"The War on Terror and the Palestinian Intifadah," House Committee on International Relations: Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia, (September 25, 2001)"